What Can YOU Learn From Minimalism?

“The average American household contains more than 300,000 possessions.”

Read that sentence. Now read it again and really consider it. Astounding, isn’t it?

It’s just one of the tidbits I learned in “Essential,” a book of essays written by The Minimalists. I known I’ve written about these guys before, but wanted to touch base on their book of essays, published in 2015. I requested my library purchase a copy and finally got my hands on it!

At its core, minimalism is about making you think. Rather than mindlessly buying more “stuff,” think about WHY you’re doing it. Rather than stashing things in your closet to collect dust for months, think about WHY you’re doing it. In a world of often-mindless consumption and consumerism, it’s nice to take a step back and think about WHY we own the things we own, WHY we do the things we do, etc.

What value is this [object/person/job/relationship/experience/etc.] bringing to your life?

That’s the question we should all be asking ourselves, and it’s definitely one I need to ask more often. The Minimalists look at that question from a number of perspectives, and in respect to various subjects, in the course of their essays in this book.

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Tips & Tricks from The Minimalists

My newest read is “Minimalism: Live a Meaningful Life,” a short book written by two gentlemen who called themselves The Minimalists. Joshua Fields Milburn and Ryan Nicodemus have a lot of great advice to offer in their book, and they literally encourage people to share portions of it, so… that’s exactly what I’m going to do.

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On Minimalism & the Ideas Behind It

Recently, I watched a phenomenal documentary on Netflix about minimalism. It’s called Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things, and it focusesd on two guys, Joshua and Ryan, who called themselves The Minimalists.

Realistically – and I have to be realistic here – I don’t think I could ever fully, truly become a minimalist. (But who knows, maybe I could!) But that doesn’t mean I didn’t take a lot of out of the documentary.

Most of us, in today’s age, have a lot of “stuff,” most of which we don’t need and half of which we probably don’t even use. That’s the first point that struck a chord with me. I look around my apartment, and all I see is stuff. I have so many clothes, half of which are t-shirts packed away in sealed bins that I’ve barely opened in the nearly two years I’ve lived here. I have so many books cluttering up the shelves, books I haven’t touched in years but can’t seem to part with. (To be fair, I had a lot MORE books before I moved, and donated probably 1/3 of my collection to charity at that time.) And then, of course, there’s the other stuff, like decorative items, that are probably cute but in the end, sit around and collect dust.

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